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  • Taking Firearms to Canada

    I have seen too many outhouse lawyers debating whether one can take firearms into Canada; most of these experts don’t have a clue. I made the trip to Alaska in July 2017 and took a 44 Mag rifle, 12-gauge shotgun and their respective ammunition. I pre-filled the required RCMP-5589e form and included the exact ammunition rounds for my firearms. Upon arrival at the Canadian border I presented the form, paid my fee, and off I went - - at no time did any Canadian official ask to see my firearms. Do your homework, know the Canadian law regarding firearms and you will have no problem traveling in Canada. The firearms permit is only good for 90 days. Handguns are NOT allowed in Canada therefore I shipped my 44 Mag handgun to Tok, AK so I would have it while fishing in bear country. I shipped the handgun home at the end of my AK vacation prior to crossing the Canadian border. As a side note, take no ammunition that is not for a firearm(s) you have declared on your RCMP-5589e form - - otherwise you run the risk of them dissecting your vehicle and/or RV looking for a firearm you haven’t declared. Lots of bears in Canada and Alaska - - bear spray is very limited on effectiveness as well as range.

    Import and Export a Firearm or Weapon into Canada
    http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/import/iefw-iefa-eng.html

    Forms
    http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/f...dex-eng.htm#f6

    Harvey

    2016 Arctic Fox 27-5L
    2015 Dodge 3500 4x4 6.7 Diesel

  • #2
    We have a significantly different culture here and thank all Americans for NOT bringing guns of any kind into our country. (Unless you are game hunting and are properly licensed to do so, of course.)

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    • #3
      Quick note on what not to say at the Canadian Border. I brought a shotgun on my 4 month trip from CA and up to and back from Alaska. Did just as BDSUSA had done with the forms, declared, paid, went fine on the way up, but not on the way back. They don't allow any guns including rifles or shotguns into any of their national parks. Since I was returning through Idaho instead of my original route through Washington, they said I was going to be too close to the national park so they would not allow me back into Canada from Alaska. I had to ship my shotgun home before they would let me in. So if your planning a trip through Canada, make sure your careful about your planned route.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by jfranzini View Post
        I was going to be too close to the national park so they would not allow me back into Canada from Alaska.
        The speed limit is 55 mph, and we know you said you are only going to drive 53 mph, but that is going to be too close to the speed limit.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jfranzini View Post
          Quick note on what not to say at the Canadian Border. I brought a shotgun on my 4 month trip from CA and up to and back from Alaska. Did just as BDSUSA had done with the forms, declared, paid, went fine on the way up, but not on the way back. They don't allow any guns including rifles or shotguns into any of their national parks. Since I was returning through Idaho instead of my original route through Washington, they said I was going to be too close to the national park so they would not allow me back into Canada from Alaska. I had to ship my shotgun home before they would let me in. So if your planning a trip through Canada, make sure your careful about your planned route.
          This sounds like an individual agent going way above and beyond his authority... but you can't argue with them. CBS agents do not enforce traffic laws or anything else not specifically involved with crossing the border. However, they will certainly contact local law enforcement for other suspicions. I have never been asked about firearms when entering a NP. In fact, if you have a pass, you just coast through the gate so the ranger can see you and they wave you on. The assumption is visitors will be informed and respectful. I couldn't find it on Parks Canada's official website so copied this from a hunting lodge's website and this has always been by understanding of the firearms regulations:

          FIREARMS IN NATIONAL PARKS

          Hunting is prohibited in Canada’s national parks. Firearms cannot be carried in national parks unless unloaded and carried in a dismantled condition by separating the barrel and stock or are in a closed case, tied securely with no parts exposed.

          Henry
          2014 Arctic Fox 22G
          2015 Silverado 1500 NHT, Blue Ox Sway Pro(2014); Equal-i-zer(2006-14)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jfranzini View Post
            They don't allow any guns including rifles or shotguns into any of their national parks.
            Originally posted by henryjfox View Post


            FIREARMS IN NATIONAL PARKS

            Firearms cannot be carried in national parks unless unloaded and carried in a dismantled condition by separating the barrel and stock or are in a closed case, tied securely with no parts exposed.

            So, apparently they do allow them into national parks.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BDSUSA View Post
              bear spray is very limited on effectiveness as well as range.
              Since you mentioned the bear spray, do you know the rules on bringing that across? I read various things on mace vs bear spray etc. Last summer I had a trip planned with some hiking in Glacier NP and then up to Banff during the Canadian free parks period (thanks Canada!). The trip got cancelled due to family stuff but I never got that bear spray vs mace figured out.

              Steve and Shelley. Minnesota
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              • #8
                Originally posted by mnSteve View Post

                Since you mentioned the bear spray, do you know the rules on bringing that across? I read various things on mace vs bear spray etc.
                When we drove through British Columbia / Yukon, on our trip to Alaska last year, we left our normally always possessed firearms at home.

                It felt a little strange not having our 'friends' in our truck & trailer, but that apprehension subsided, once entering Canada.

                Mace / pepper spray is a big NO in Canada. So are offensive knives, tasers, stun guns, etc. https://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/import/iefw-iefa-eng.html

                We purchased two cans of bear spray before our trip. The canisters must clearly say bear spray per Canadian border rules.

                Even if pepper spray (with it's pin-point spray) were legal, you don't want to wait until a bear gets within 6-8 feet to use. The bear spray canisters are more like long-range fire extinguishers. They will spray 30+ feet away, and leave a fog in the air during escape.

                Once we entered the Yukon and Alaska, everyone on the trails and other non-town areas, carried the spray. All the rangers, construction workers and outdoor workers all carried the canisters on their belt.

                There have been many studies and real-world uses, that show the bear spray works. https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/nature/bearspray.htm

                We talked to two US Park rangers in Hyder at the Grizzly Creek viewing area. They all carry bear spray and have had to use it on many occasions.

                They said the spray works as intended on the wild grizzly's & black bears. The ranger station even had a series of photographs of a ranger spraying a grizzly, who entered the boardwalk area.

                Out hunting in the bush or covered in fish guts, and I would also want a LARGE handgun as BDSUSA talked about.

                On our numerous travels into Canada, border entry agents always ask us about firearms and pepper spray. One our last trip, we were asked to show our two cans of bear spray, when entering Stewart BC from Hyder, AK.

                Even with the proper Canadian forms, a cranky border agent can still deny entry of your long gun, if he doesn't like your reason for possession. There's no place to easily store a firearm at the border and I don't want an extended trip delayed / cancelled, because of one arbitrary rule.

                For 'personal protection', I'm sure bear spray would work on 'human animals' and carrying a baseball bat (and of course an old glove), would work also .
                Travel Blog: www.rocklinroamers.wordpress.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by RocklinDave View Post



                  It felt a little strange not having our 'friends'
                  It is interesting that many commonly quoted understandings of pistol versus bear are disproved when factual research is examined. In one seminal study, (SMITH et al), "handguns" had an 84% success rate in stopping bear attacks. This study included brown, black, polar and unidentified species.

                  In a more recent source, the success rate of (modern) 9mm firearms versus bear attacks was surprising in that the (lack of) failure rate was no different than other common calibers including those considered large bore (.44 magnum, .44 Casull, etc). The common denominator in successful repulsion of a bear attack was not caliber of the firearm but the willingness to engage the bear with gunfire as soon as there was any indication that the bear would aggress (any movement towards the human instead of moving away).

                  The methodology of research is also critical when examining handgun failure rates. Some studies that purport to show failure includes data for when the firearm is present but not used.

                  Some people have advanced the idea that wearing bells while hiking, in addition to pepper spray, will ward off bear attack. Anecdotal data from those events and examination of bear scat shows it to be shiny and highly spiced.

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                  • #10
                    I read a good book on bear attacks by Stephen Herrero. He studied all the documented attacks and tried to examine why the bear might have attacked, and what might have been the best action. When my wife and I went to a fishing camp in Alaska, we went over to Brooks River in the Katmai National Park and Preserve one day. This is where that waterfall is that you always see the bears fishing in. To get to the falls you walk down a .5 to .75 mile wooded path where there is likely some bears.They give you a briefing and tell you to just get off the trail into the woods and the bears will go by you because they want the salmon. It was true as we had some very close encounters. This close:
                    Click image for larger version  Name:	p1.jpg Views:	1 Size:	214.4 KB ID:	271385
                    Steve and Shelley. Minnesota
                    2017 RAM 3500 LLH CC 4x4 LB DRW 6.7ctd Aisin 4.10 Air Level aka Shrek
                    2018 AF 27-5L, HW50C ems, Maxxis Tires, TST 507, dual AC, tank heaters, Rear Camera, Toppers, 640w Solar, Victron MP 3000 Inverter, MPPT 150/85 solar charge controller, CCGX Color Monitor,BMV702 Battery Monitor
                    , 440AH Lifeline AGM, aka Fiona

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                    • #11
                      mnSteve,

                      Here's a large wild Grizzly looking for salmon, we encountered on our 2016 Alaska trip (note the large claws, used to wave at summer tourists):

                      Click image for larger version  Name:	457.JPG Views:	2 Size:	3.77 MB ID:	271388 Click image for larger version  Name:	455.JPG Views:	1 Size:	2.28 MB ID:	271389
                      Travel Blog: www.rocklinroamers.wordpress.com

                      2015 Chevrolet Silverado 3500HD:SRW, Duramax / Allison 6.6L Turbo-Diesel, Extended Cab, Long Bed, 4x4, Reese 16K Hitch, 50gal In-Bed Fuel Tank (85 gals total)

                      2016 Arctic Fox 29-5T:Six-Point Leveling System, Fireplace, Two A/C's, Two Honda EU2000i Generators, TST "507" Tire Monitoring System, King-Size Bed, Progressive 'Hard-Wired' 50amp Surge Protector, 16gal Water Heater, Slide-Toppers, Power-Reel, 'G Rated' Sailun Tires.

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                      • #12
                        News today: American couple charged after 24 undeclared guns seized at Alberta border

                        Authorities found eight handguns, 16 long guns and 70 over-capacity ammunition magazines that had not been declared, the CBSA said. Four of the firearms were classified as prohibited, which means they cannot be imported into Canada under any circumstances.

                        The couple was charged with seven counts under the Customs Act and eight counts under the Criminal Code.

                        They could both face fines of up to $500,000 and up to 10 years in prison for the unauthorized possession of prohibited firearms.

                        “Failing to declare at the border is not a time-saver, and it is definitely not worth the risk,” Guy Rook, CBSA Director for southern Alberta, said in a statement. “We are happy to assist lawful gun owners with importing their firearms properly, but if you don’t declare them, you are breaking the law and will be treated accordingly.”


                        Full story here:
                        http://calgaryherald.com/news/canada...2-93cefb173a3c
                        2015 AF 25W
                        2015 Ford F350, 6.7l diesel
                        Blue Ox SwayPro (1,500 lb)
                        along with Wendy and Dobby, the Labradoodle house elf.

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